absolute positive swingin’ in 1951

Charlie Parker, Diz and co.

Diz was cool personified. A master of music and friendship, a leader of bands of men. A smile that said, I am in on the big joke baby, I am in on the sadness – but I will play the gladness – I will make the groove and play in it…

Charlie Parker could improvise endlessly – that is creative genius – ideas and ideas on ideas – ideas for his whole life – and all of it was tasty, in the pocket, never off – and you had to jump! – but no, not  just a volcanic eruption of  creativity – it was focused, a hot laser on your soul, burning you up…

and so…

Here is Jack (and Steve) with a kind of ode, paean, a valediction really, to for and about Charlie Parker:

I believe it is from his masterwork, Mexico City Blues…

Langston Hughes and Jack Kerouac


cf.

Langston Hughes, born February 1, 1902, in Joplin, Missouri preceeded the beat poets by about 30 years. Yet his poems and stories had much in common with Alan Ginsburg, Jack Kerouac and the beat movement. Langston Hughes wrote about the lives of Afro Americans between the 1930’s and the 1960’s with the realism of beat writers and their attention to detail. Like the beats, Hughes also had a passion for travel and visited Mexico, Africa, Europe… and worked as a seaman like Jack Kerouac.
– From the Blues for peace website

The commonality extends to their voices and deliveries as well. Interesting stuff. I would reverse the text to read, “the beats, like Langston Hughes” and “Jack Kerouac, like Langston Hughes” because he came first, but that is quibbling. I found their site because I wondered if anyone else noticed all of the similarities. Good job BFP. They say they’re not political. Well, everything is political. if you’re going to call yourself Blues for Peace and you won’t even say a few words for Palestinian rights…hmmm…

Naropa University Archive Project

naropa_image

click above to go to archive. an amazing resource. the site archive.org that hosts it is also an amazing resource. enjoy.

Description from site:

The Naropa University Archive Project is preserving and providing access to over 5000 hours of recordings made at Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado. The library was developed under the auspices of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics (the university’s Department of Writing and Poetics) founded in 1974 by poets Anne Waldman and Allen Ginsberg. It contains readings, lectures, performances, seminars, panels and workshops conducted at Naropa by many of the leading figures of the U.S.literary avant-garde.

The collection represents several generations of artists who have contributed to aesthetic and cultural change in the postmodern era. The Naropa University Archive Project seeks to enhance appreciation and understanding of post-World War II American literature and its role in social change, cultural criticism, and the literary arts through widespread dissemination of the actual voices of the poets and writers of this period. Current interest in Oriental religions, environmentalism, political activism, ethnic studies, and women’s consciousness is directly indebted to the work of these New American Poets, writers and musicians.

Funding for this project was provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Save America’s Treasures, the GRAMMY Foundation, the Internet Archive, the Collaborative Digitization Program, and private donors. If this collection is important to you please help us preserve it with your donations.

For more information visit our web site at http://www.naropaarchive.org or email us at archive@naropa.edu.
See a Tag Cloud for the this collection.

absolute positive swingin’ in 1952

Charlie Parker, Diz and co.

Diz was cool personified. A master of music and friendship, a leader of bands of men. A smile that said, i am in on the big joke baby, i am in on the sadness – but i will play the gladness – i will make the groove and play in it…

Charlie Parker could improvise endlessly – that is creative genius – a genius for creativity, ideas and ideas on ideas – ideas for his whole life – and all of it was tasty, in the pocket, never off – and you had to jump! – but no, not  just a volcanic eruption of  creativity – it was focused, a hot laser on your soul, burning you up…

and so…

here is Jack (and Steve) with a kind of ode, paean, a valediction really, to for and about Charlie Parker:

I believe it is from his masterwork, Mexico City Blues…